Interview with Australian actor Belinda Jombwe about her new role

Belinda Jombwe studied at NIDA and is known for her outstanding theatre work in Black Jesus (Bakehouse Theatre) as Eunice Ncube, Beth in Samson (Belvoir) and Winnie in My Wonderful Day (Ensemble Theatre Co) and many more. She’s working in an upcoming Australian feature film, The Casting Game (directed by Pearl Tan).

belinda-jombwe-head-sml-shot-2

Qu.1. How did you start your acting career?

I have always had a love for the arts, particularly acting. From a young age I was heavily involved in drama classes inside and outside of school. When I graduated from year 12 I moved to Sydney on a whim to pursue acting as a career. I studied performance at Sydney Uni, and was involved in a lot of fringe theatre at the Australian Theatre for Young People and New theatre. What started my professional career was the opportunity I had at Ensemble theatre in ‘My Wonderful Day’ to play Winnie. The ball kind of got rolling from there. To this day it’s one of the most memorable ensembles and productions I have ever been in.

Qu.2. Who were your role models on TV/Film when you were growing up and why?

There are many actors who I found inspirational growing up and continue to find inspirational. Actors like Susan Sarandon, Meryl Streep and Denzel Washington to name a few. I find their dedication to their craft and their ability to transform into other worlds while maintaining an uncompromising sense of self quite amazing.

My ‘role models’ have been influential more in my adult years. Women like Viola Davis and Kerry Washington I look up to. Through their career progression and outspokenness in the industry, they have profoundly shaped the perspective I have of myself as an actor. They are strong, black women, and they inspire me to challenge myself and stereotypes, and it’s refreshing to see them play roles that are complex and not dependant on the way they look.  I think naturally we find role models in people who we strongly identify with. In people who motivate us to be better people.

belinda-jombwe-2-sml

Qu.3. Do you think there are enough diverse roles for people of colour in Australian TV / Film?

Haha, No. I think there will be enough diverse roles for people of colour (and all other minority groups) in Australian TV/Film when diversity isn’t even a thing. When TV and film reflects our unique and multifaceted society and where diversity on TV/film becomes just a way of life. We have a long way to go, but I’m happy that we are going in the right direction. I think it’s everyone’s collective responsibility to continually improve this. Every person has a way in which they can make diversity more mainstream. Casting agents, writers, networks, producers, actors and audiences can all contribute to making diversity more mainstream by the choices they make and what they choose to accept.

Qu.4. What would your ideal role be and why?

I always have trouble answering this question. I don’t  have an ideal role in terms of the ‘type’ of person I would like to play. As ultimately, I believe all characters I play reveal a unique aspect of myself. Any role in which I get to explore, play and have a positive impact is ideal.

belinda-jombwe-headshot-3-sml

Qu.5. What’s your next exciting project?

The Casting Game. A film written by Joy Hopwood and directed by Pearl Tan. I’m really looking forward to it. It’s hilarious, and there is a great team behind it.

Qu.6. Where do you see yourself in 10 years time?

Passionate about life, family and friends. Ambitious to learn and grow.

casting-game-sml

The Casting Game (directed by Pearl Tan) will be premiering on Sunday, September 10th at Hoyts Mandarin Centre, closing the annual Joy House Film Festival, Level 3, 65 Albert Ave, Chatswood NSW 2067.

 

Interview with Michelle Lim Davidson about Australian Films, television & diversity.

goldstone

  1. What made you want to do acting as a career?

I started dance lessons when I was five & had a keen interest in singing too. Even though I was up on stage dancing in competitions almost every weekend I was extremely shy. Acting started for me when parents sent me to drama lessons to ‘bring me out of my shell’. It worked and I feel in love with acting. I never in a million years thought I would be an actress.

  1. What were the challenges you found when you started?

I graduated from WAAPA in 2010. At my graduation showcase I had some industry professionals tell me ‘As an asian girl you’ll never work on television, it’s not us it’s the networks they just won’t hire you’ and ‘You should learn karate if you want to have a career on film’. I was shocked, this may sound completely naive but during my time at drama school I was never aware that my ethnicity could possibly limit my future employment. Ironically I booked my first job on television and there was no karate required.

  1. Who were your role models growing and why?

I honestly can’t remember having specific role models growing up, I didn’t have any people in particular that I idolised. However there was a lot of people growing up who supported and encouraged me to believe in myself. I wouldn’t be where I am today without people like my dance teachers, high school drama teachers, my family & friends guiding and supporting me.

Play School MLD.jpg

4.What is your career highlight (or highlights?) & Why?.

I’ve been very fortunate to have had the opportunity to work on a diverse range projects. One highlight is being a presenter on Play School. I had one mother tell me her daughter was watching Play School & had never seen an Australian/Asian woman on tv. She was so excited & said‘Mummy she has the same eyes as me, one day i’m going to be on tv like Michelle’. It’s so amazing to hear your work can encourage & inspire a little girl who just wanted to see someone like her on the T.V.

  1. What do you think about Colourblind casting in Australia?

In my 6 years of being a professional actress I have witnessed many excellent changes in colourblind casting. For me i’ve never understood why it’s not just common sense to reflect the diversity of our society on stage and screen, it seems so straightforward in my mind. I hope in years to come this is no longer an issue. For now we need to continue to fight for diversity until we see equality for all who work in this industry.

  1. What do you think about the diversity issue in Australian TV/ Film / Theatre?

I like to remain positive about the diversity issues in our industry for I truly believe change is happening. I am also grateful for all the people who have campaigned for change over many years so artists like myself in recent years have had better opportunities to work in this industry. We still have a long way to go but i’m positive that we can continue to move forward. There is a keen and vigorous discussion around diversity in the industry which is exciting to be a part of. I find initiatives such as the Equity Diversity Committee very encouraging and inspiring and I would like to continue to be part of the change.

UtopiaMLD.jpg

  1. Where do you see yourself in 5 years time? (What do you want to achieve?).

This is a tricky question to answer for me. I haven’t thought about what i’m doing tomorrow let alone if 5 years time. I’m very much take each day as it comes along. I hope I still have to opportunity to act in tv/film/theatre. I hope I can venture overseas to the USA and challenge myself as an actress. I would like to continue to grow and become a better artist and I hope I’m doing an interview in the future about how diversity in the Australian entertainment industry is about how diversity in the Australian entertainment industry is no longer an issue.

Photos courtesy of Michelle Lim Davidson – Play School (ABC), Utopia, Goldstone

Interview with Takaya Honda (The Family Law/ Play School) and now Neighbours!

Screen shot 2016-09-05 at 6.21.38 PM
*

Takaya Honda is an Australian stage and screen actor. He’s known for his role as Klaus Thomson in the 2016 comedy TV series, The Family Law , Play School and now Neighbours.

He was born in Canberra, but moved to Sydney at a young age and attended Sydney school Barker College graduating in 2005. He then attended the College Of Fine Arts (UNSW) in 2006 studying a Bachelor of Digital Media before transferring to the University of Technology Sydney in 2007 to study a Bachelor of Arts in Communication (MediaArts and Production) which he graduated from on the 29th April 2011.

JOY: Congratulations on landing a regular role for Neighbours. Please tell us briefly about the whole casting process.

*
TAKAYA: The audition process began with a self test. I had originally been sent the sides for the role of my twin, Leo but was able to get my hands on the sides for David from a friend, filmed both and sent them through to casting. About two weeks after that I got a call back and had to fly down to Melbourne. For the call back I had to prepare for both roles, so had to know both scenes and they also sent a scene through between the two brothers and I had to learn both roles in that as well. The callback was with about 7 others, all of varying Asian mixes, we were called in at different points to either play the scenes either with the actors playing the roles opposite (in this case Zoe Cramond and Matt Wilson) or one of the other auditionees and we were at the studios for about 4-5 hours. About two weeks after that I had to fly back down to Melbourne again for another callback. This time we had to have all three previous scenes ready, as well as three new ones, two with another character in the show (who I don’t think I can name) and another between the two brothers, again learning both sides of the scenes. This call back had us down to the ‘final’ four. It was another lengthy audition lasting a few hours and with a lot of chop and changing between different combinations of people. In this callback we were fortunate to be able to run the scenes with the current cast members prior to going into the room, which was a huge help. After that callback it took around 2-3 weeks before I got the call from my agent saying I had gotten the role of David.
 *
JOY: Would you say Neighbours is your breakthrough role?
TAKAYA: It’s hard to say what my breakthrough role is, whether I’ve had it or even whether Neighbours is (will be) that. I feel it is something for others to judge. However I have been awarded some amazing experiences, from my first role (and audition) with A Gurls Wurld through to The Family Law, My Great Big Adventure, Play School and now Neighbours. To a degree I feel it’s hard for those of diverse backgrounds to have breakthrough roles in the same way as our caucasian acting brethren. I feel that the opportunities I have had would have opened more doors to a caucasian actor than have been for me. But, I must be clear in saying that I am truly very grateful for these opportunities.
*
Takaya 1 sml.jpg
 *
JOY: What made you want to get into the film/TV industry?

TAKAYA: Growing up I kinda wanted to do everything. I wanted to be the doctor, the lawyer and the fighter pilot and I came to realise that acting would allow me to play all of those things and more! I’ve also always had a passion for the visual – ever since I got my hands on a camera I have not been able to help myself but to try to capture the things I see around me.

JOY: How did you get started in your career?
TAKAYA: I had some fantastically supportive teachers at High School (Barker College), namely Damien Ryan and Terry Karabelas who really gave me an understanding of what Acting is and the reality of what a career in acting can be. Damien then invited me to perform with Sport For Jove Theatre Company where I have performed in a bunch of Shakespeare plays which lead to getting representation and the slog of years of working odd jobs with a peppering of Acting gigs. I’ve been a videographer/editor, photographer, light and sound rigging crew, cinema usher, web administrator, promotional model, casting assistant and the classic actor job – a bartender. I have done my best to keep my work as relevant as I could to the industry and am cherishing the time I am given now to be working as an actor full-time.
*
Screen shot 2016-09-05 at 6.21.31 PM
*
JOY: Do you think there’s a positive change in the TV/Film industries for more diversity?
TAKAYA: I think there is, the efforts that Neighbours are making are very positive and I do believe they are trying to do it the right way. With our characters, rather than be the two asian guys moving into Erinsborough, we are two Australians who have Japanese heritage and our storylines are like any other characters on the show, not ethnically specific, which is quite refreshing. We do not feel any pressure to be representatives for Japan or the immigrant experience – we just get to play within the world of our characters, which is rich with ‘Neighbours’ drama. The Family Law is another great example of a positive move within the industry and I hope that there are more opportunities like these ahead across the full gamut of Australian media.
*
JOY: Who inspires you in the industry?
TAKAYA: Those who inspire me in the industry are those who give back to it, and the broader community. Those who use the platform of celebrity to increase the amount of joy in the world are really who I look up to. In terms of acting I could rattle off the usual suspects but to me the likes of Miranda Tapsell as seemingly the industries voice of diversity, Charlotte Nicdao for being a friend who is so incredible at articulating her wisdom not just to me but the broader public (even in the face of denigrating criticism), Waleed Aly for the reasoning he brings to arguments and when thinking towards the international industry, Seth and Lauren Rogen for their work on Alzheimer’s, Aziz Ansari for so cleverly integrating the struggle of diverse actors into ‘Master of None’ – I could go on, but these humans who have taken the gift of popularity and used it for something outside of themselves, and who work towards bettering us as a whole. These people inspire me.
 *
JOY: What do you want to achieve in the future?
TAKAYA: Everything. haha. I don’t know – it is so hard in this industry to predict or dictate your own career that for me I like to provide myself with options and be happy with whatever path appears to me. Even just a couple of weeks before auditioning for Neighbours I wouldn’t have thought that it would have been a part of my journey. So, I like to stay open and positive because you just never know.

Interview with Jeremy Fernandez about Diversity in Australian Media

Jeremy Fernandez grew up in Malaysia before his family migrated to Australia when he was 13. He is an Australian journalist and a television news presenter with ABC News 24. Fernandez joined theAustralian Broadcasting Corporation in 2000 working as a producer for ABC Local Radio. He has worked as a voice-over artist for Seven Network and has worked with CNN International in London, UK as a writer and a producer before joining ABC again in 2010. I had the pleasure of interviewing Jeremy on behalf of The Equity Diversity Committee about Diversity in Australian Media.

Jeremy Fernandez 1.jpg

Who were your role models on TV / film when growing up here in Australia? 

Some of my earliest role models were actually teachers. I often wished to be as knowledgeable, articulate, patient, and generous as many of them were. Some of these early role models had grown-up poor, or disabled. Many were women. Some were gay, young, elderly, religious, atheist. And they had different skin colours. The diversity didn’t strike me as remarkable. It was only in my mid-teens that I noticed my reality was barely reflected on screen.

What gives you joy and satisfaction in your job each day?

I’m surrounded at the ABC, by some of the cleverest, most hardworking people in the industry. So I’m regularly star-struck.

I love the varied nature of my work: One day I’m writing & researching; And the next, I’m on air with rolling news for 3 hours.

I get the biggest buzz out of breaking news, particularly on location as a presenter and reporter. Interacting with viewers in real life, or on social media, is great. For all that’s changing in this industry nothing beats face-to-face time.

Jeremy Fernandez 2

Did you experience any barriers trying to break into Australian journalism & broadcasting?

I consider myself very lucky to do the work I do. Of course, there were those who told me not to go barking up the wrong career tree. Most of them weren’t being mean-spirited. They wanted me to know that this was not an industry known for its diversity. I came into it with both eyes open, and tried my luck anyway. I will however, admit to being dogged about proving wrong, the guy who told me, “Don’t worry. There’s always SBS”. I love SBS, of course. But it shouldn’t be the only source of media employment for the large fraction of Australians who were born overseas.

Do you think there’s enough diverse representation in Australian media / TV / film? (If not, what changes would you like to see?)

I’ve had a great run with the ABC. But even ol’ Aunty will admit there’s work to do, as there is in much of corporate Australia. I think we need more indigenous voices & faces in the mainstream media. I’d also like to see diversity understood more broadly. Intersectionality between race, gender, sexuality, disability, wealth, and age is more than we can necessarily see with the naked eye. But it harbours a tremendous amount of valuable lived experience.

ABC logo

What advice would you like to give to up and coming journalists and for those breaking into television?

Don’t do it if you’re just looking to get your mug on screen. It gets old very quickly. Learn to write well. Develop an eye for detail. Be OK with shift work. Be inquisitive- ask the ‘dumb questions’ everyone else is afraid to ask. Be respectful of your subjects & audience, even if you disagree with them. Dream big, but also be honest with yourself. Define success your own way. And don’t be afraid to change your mind.

Photos courtesy of Jeremy Fernandez (ABC TV)

Logies 2016 a big win for diversity

Last night was a big win for diversity at the 2016 Logie Awards (equivalent to the Emmy’s in USA). For over forty years we’ve witnessed the Logies being so white, however this year we saw more diversity with Lee Lin Chin and Waleed Aly being nominated for gold. The results surprised us all with the Gold Logie being won by a Muslim Australian panel host of The Project Waleed Aly!

Waleed’s victory speech was filled with emotion, considering the backlash he and other contender of colour Lee Lin Chin received before this awards night. His victory speech was a great opportunity to highlight the need for diversity in Australian TV, and his win is a step closer towards this cause.“Do not adjust your sets … there’s nothing wrong with the picture,” he told the audience at the Palladium Ballroom, Crown Towers, in Melbourne. “I’m sure there’s an Instagram filter you can use to return things to normal.”

Screen shot 2016-05-09 at 10.48.12 AM.png

He said the award mattered because people with names like Mustafa and Dimitri had struggled to find jobs in an industry dominated by white faces like himself. Mustafa went up to him and confessed that he had to change his name in order to be accepted in the industry.

“To Dimitri and Mustafa and all the other people with unpronounceable names like Waleed, I want to say one thing: that is that I am incredibly humbled you would even think to invest in me that way.

“But I’m also incredibly saddened by it, because the truth is you deserve more numerous and more worthy avatars than that.

“I don’t know if and when that’s going to happen but if tonight means anything … that is the Australian public, our audience, as far as they’re concerned there is absolutely no reason that can’t change.”

It was finally a great realisation for many, that Australia is no longer a white nation (on screen), but it’s a nation of diversity and social cohesion. Congratulations to Waleed Aly for breaking the so called ‘white’ stereotype and may this be the critical step forward for change and diversity on screen which is so needed in this country, in order to feel that we all belong, together.

 

Youtube / pictures courtesy of Channel 9

Being in a Creative Relationship – How to make it work (Pillow Talk #SpectrumNow Review)

Six well-known creative couples talked openly about their relationships at Spectrum Now’s March festival 2016. They included: David Williamson, Australia’s most successful playwright and his author wife, Kristin, all round entertainer David Campbell and his producer wife Lisa, actor Rob Carlton who played Kerry Packer in the ABC’s Paper Giants series and his wife, writer Adrienne Ferreira, all talked openly about their relationships. They discussed the tough times, how they made it through and what they did to make their creative lives work.

Screen shot 2016-03-06 at 11.05.57 PM

Photo courtesy of ABC

It was love at first sight for David Williamson when he first met his now wife Kristin, though they were both married to other people at the time, he distinctively remembers what she wore which made him fall head over heals in love with her. Kristin remembers his great charisma and the way he was passionate when talking about his work. They met on his first production of The Removalists. She remembers when doing a play read for him, he was actively gesturing, gregarious and witty which appealed to her. He admitted that he once cast himself in one of his earlier plays, and burst out laughing just before a funny line was delivered. He hasn’t returned to acting since!

Screen shot 2016-03-06 at 10.28.18 PM

It was a few years later that the two split with their partners at the time, and there was a lot of hurt and pain before coming together as a couple. The Williamson’s greatest challenge came out of their open marriage in the 1970s which led to Kristin writing a list of people she could “bear to be with” as David was doing it, why couldn’t she? It wasn’t until she admitted that she was falling for a man on her list that David changed, cleaned up his act and really started listening to her. He said, “It wasn’t until I felt that I was losing her, I realised I could no longer do this.” David confessed that the whole open marriage thing doesn’t work because “sexual jealousy is deeply rooted in our inner most nature and you can’t emotionally deconstruct it.” It comes with the human psyche. Since that breakdown in their marriage he realised what a treasure he has and together they’ve worked through their relationship battles and Kristin found her own identity and career in journalism, and became known independently. She said what they went through has made their relationship stronger. Together they work as a team. She often reads through David’s drafts and has learned to be careful when putting forth criticisms because in the past he was very sensitive and often over reacted to her suggestions. David said like most writers, he draws on his own personal experiences and writes about them, giving characters different names and alters situations to make them more dramatic. Kristin often discovers when watching his plays on stage pieces of familiar dialogue and says, “That’s what I said to you last night!”

He says what he loves about Kristin is that he’s still attracted to her; he still sees her younger self and loves her inner soul and honesty. Kristin said what she loves best about David is his sense of humour and that he always makes her laugh, his intellect and curiosity in life. That’s what makes their relationship work.

Screen shot 2016-03-06 at 10.49.24 PM

Photo courtesy of On Broadway album cover

The next creative couple was David and Lisa Campbell. David confessed that it was during The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee  musical when this British woman from the cast of An Inspector Calls came backstage. Back in his drinking days, they had a theatre tradition called Thirsty Thursdays and Magda Szubanski, who was also in the Spelling Bee, invited the Inspector Calls company over for drinks. They were all fangirling over Magda because they loved Kath & Kim and it was her who set him up with Lisa.

Screen shot 2016-03-06 at 10.46.17 PM

The two hit it off instantly and got together just after three weeks of dating and became engaged in Paris. In 2008 they married and set up their own creative production company Luckiest Productions where they produced all of David’s national tours, as well as other productions. It was only once during David’s 80’s tour that they struggled financially. They admit that they had counselling and joked that it was Lisa who had the counsellor first, then David joined her sessions and ended up taking her counsellor. Discussing things openly and accepting the creative chaos in their lives helps them through their relationship challenges. After David’s 80’s tour he soon landed a regular gig at Channel Nine, co-hosting with Sonia Kruger. Lisa then started producing successful musicals and is currently producing Little Shop of Horrors at Hayes Theatre and reveals what she loves about David is his singing. “When he gets up on stage and starts singing, I fall in love with him all over again because he’s just so talented,” Lisa says. She also admits that he helps her connect with people for her productions. For example she was looking for a voice of authority, with a God-like tone, and Geoffrey Rush was going to do it but then had to pull out so Lee Lin Chin was suggested and David said he could get hold of her because he has a contact at SBS. David says what he loves about Lisa is how she’s a leader, “she’s the boss!”

“What I don’t like about David is his indecisiveness,” Lisa jokes.

David agrees, “Yes, even when I’m ordering, I always ask what the specials are but never order them. I’m just curious and want to know, but I’ll still order the same thing. What I love about Lisa is how she nurtures the next pool of talent coming through and she’s her own institution.”

Screen shot 2016-03-06 at 10.51.57 PM

 photo courtesy of Saxton.com.au

The last couple was actor Rob Carlton who played Kerry Packer in the ABC’s Paper Giants series and his wife, writer Adrienne Ferreira.

“On our first date Rob wanted to kiss me before dinner! I said no and had to pull the reins in!” says Adrienne.

Rob said they had previously met five years before at university and he wasn’t someone Adrienne was interested in at the time because he was a night owl and loved drinking and smoking. It was five years later when they met again and Rob pursued her. They eventually got together and had two boys and his career grew. He raised money, produced his own TV series and had his own production company, and was on a creative high. It was during this high moment in life that he came home from work one night and made dinner for his family and Adrienne started crying at the dinner table. She said,”I’m not kind enough to you,” (pause). Rob gets up from his seat on stage and tells the audience, “Oh, isn’t that sweet, but wait, then she went on to say, ‘because I don’t like you anymore!” Those words came out of nowhere and shocked him to the core and made him think- OK at least she didn’t bring it up during an argument. She was honest and brave enough to say these words calmly to him and reveal how she’s truly feeling. He then made a list of character flaws of himself and said he’d work on them. During this time Adrienne let out her frustrations by writing a screenplay which was devastating for Rob to read, as the protagonist was a mother who used to get up to mischief on weekends.  She even asked him to direct it. There were so many issues in the play that he uncovered – the comic irony of what the mother in the story was getting up to on weekends was mind boggling for him to read and comprehend. He then thought, OK this is how my wife’s feeling. Rob then announced to her, “You’re responsible for your own happiness, I can’t make you happy. Only you can make yourself happy.”

Screen shot 2016-03-07 at 12.16.01 AM

From that point onwards they came to an understanding that relationships change and we all evolve, it will never stand still and stay the same. She admitted she was feeling down because she didn’t have her own identity as she was part of his limelight. After writing her screenplay, Adrienne wrote novels and got published. She’s now a successful writer and has her own identity and success.

I’d like to thank them all for sharing their honest stories with everyone so we can learn from their experiences. This was one of my favourite yearly #SpectrumNow events- hearing nothing but honest stories from creatives.

Q & A with The Family Law’s Trystan Go

Trystan 1 sml
*
Introducing The Family Law‘s Trystan Go, the actor whose credits also include The King And I and plays Benjamin Law in the small screen adaptation of the best-selling memoir about life on the Sunshine Coast in 1990s, Queensland.
*
The Family Law sml book
*
Joy: Congratulations on a wonderful performance and season of The Family Law on SBS. How did your acting career start?
*
Trystan: It all started when I was in a play called ‘The Quiet Brother’ which I did in the quaint little country town of Harrietville. The play was a dark, period drama about the Chinese gold field riots so it was quite the opposite of this cringe-worthy comedy, ‘The Family Law’. I guess I caught the acting bug so I took various classes at NIDA and Brent St to broaden my knowledge on performing. Since then, I’ve done several other plays and was recently cast as The King of Siam’s eldest son, Prince Chulalongkorn in Opera Australia’s ‘The King and I’. Performing classics like ‘Getting To Know You’ with Lisa McCune and Teddy Tahu Rhodes at The Sydney Opera House every night was one of the most sumptuous experiences of my life! ‘The Family Law’ was my first breakthrough role on screen and I’m so glad that I’ve had the opportunity to work in Theatre, Musical Theatre and Television!
*
TrystanGoKingandI sml.jpg
*

Joy: Who were your role models in film and television growing up in Australia?

*
Trystan: In primary school, I watched Play School. Even my Grandma would marvel at the fact that there was someone with Asian heritage on television. This is why I’m loving that channels like SBS and ABC are introducing and promoting multiculturalism in the media. I also admire Jay Laga’aia from Wicked The Musical for his versatility in performance as he has done films, television, theatre and music.
*
Joy: What would your dream acting role be?
*
Trystan: I think any role that is wacky and unique is the role I’d enjoy playing, which is partly the reason why I loved playing Benjamin Law so much. I mean, how often do you get to dress up in a watermelon costume, with a stark red face and dance around in front of hundreds while playing the clarinet?! Then again, I’d also love to play a really dark, serious and scary character…maybe a Chinese ​Phantom from ‘The Phantom of the Opera’ as there has already been ​an African-American one.​ Or I could move up the hierarchy and play The King of Siam in ‘The King and I’. So I guess you could say that I would be happy with any challenging role that is thrown my way.
*
Trystan Go as Ben Law(2) sml
*
Joy: Do you think there’s enough diversity in Australian Film and TV?
*
Trystan: Growing up in the 21st Century, I haven’t seen too much diversity on our Australian Screens. Of course there would be the odd Asian typecast here and there but apart from that, I think our screens are lacking a bit of ‘colour’.
Australia is an incredibly multicultural society, however I don’t think that this is reflected enough in Australian productions. It would be wonderful to see an ethnic lead in an Australian feature film or sitcom​.​ This is why I am so pleased that Matchbox Pictures has produced ‘The Family Law’ and that I’ve been a part of this ground-breaking production.  It’s a sitcom about an Australian family which just so happens to be Asian.
*
Screen shot 2016-01-11 at 3.55.48 PM
*
Joy: Where would you like to see yourself in 20 years time and why?
*
Trystan: I definitely would want to be in more productions, however I’d also really love to run a major hotel chain​ as I’d practically bathe in warm dessert buffets and international canapés. I might even make use of the 50metre heated pool​ before hand!