Diversity Spotlight: Interview with Andy Trieu (SBS)

Andy Trieu, is an Australian host, actor and martial artist. He was born in Canberra, Australia to Vietnamese parents. Originally a martial artist, Andy expanded his repertoire from competing in tournaments to performing in roles across stage and screen. He has acted and presented on the on programmes such as Kitchen Whiz as the Kitchen Ninja, minor role in Rescue: Special Ops and Crime Investigations. He has also appeared on SBS network shows Houso’s, Bollywood Star and is a current a host on SBS PopAsia. He also acted in the 2015 ABC TV comedy Maximum Choppage as Fury and has just finished a comedy series for Channel Ten called “Street Smart” which  airs in August.

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JOY: What made you want to get into the film/TV industry?

ANDY: Jackie Chan! I watched a lot of Kung fu movies.

I first got cast in a small Martial Arts film and I caught the performing bug from there. I also got my start being a Ninja on a kids TV show,  “Kitchen Whiz” . After 495 episodes there was no turning back… Ninjas don’t turn back.

JOY: Who were your role models growing up & why?

ANDY: Jackie Chan!

But when I started my career in presenting I looked up to Anh Do. He’s had a great career playing roles that suited his personality and skill sets and I guess I wanted that.

He was such a household name that you could tell people you were “Trying to Anh Do” if they asked you about future aspirations.

I also like a lot of the SBS presenters like Lee Lin Chin,  Marc Fennell, Jan Fran, Mark Humphries. They do great work and it’s very inspiring.

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JOY: How did you get started in your career?

ANDY: Well I had time and I said “Yes” A LOT. If anyone had something for me to do I would do it…hold a boom pole, be a camera assistant, dance like monkey… I would do it. I eventually built up a portfolio of work and got an agent and started landing work after every first audition.. BOOM! Just kidding…it took me more than 30 auditions before I could land an acting job and those roles were like “Asian Tourist Guy 2”. #livingthedream

Saying “Yes” and dancing like a monkey eventually helped me build contacts in the industry and I was given the opportunity to work on projects like Tomorrow When the War Began, Wolverine, Hacksaw Ridge, and finally Home and Away (Asian Tourist Guy 2). Getting my start in TV has been thanks to the good people I’ve met that believed in my weirdness. Those people for me were producers Matthew Boughen and Monica O’Brien who gave me opportunities on commercial networks and Maddy Fryer at SBS.

JOY: Do you think there’s a positive change in the TV/Film industries for more diversity?

ANDY: Yes! There is definitely a demand for ethnic stories and diverse faces on screen that reflect our community. It’s looking up every year, more contributions of a diversity of cultures to the continuing development of Australian society.

JOY: What are you working on now?

ANDY: I just completed a comedy series for Channel Ten called “Street Smart” which  airs in August! I’m also coming on my 5th year at SBS, hosting and creating segments for SBS PopAsia, Australia’s number #1 destination for Asian Pop and Pop culture. Other than that a Kung fu TV show in the pipeline 😉

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JOY: What is your dream role & why?

ANDY: Other than my amazing job right now I have two. One would be to lead an action Kung fu comedy show and the other would be to host a fun lifestyle travel program. I think boarding these two projects would seem like I had gone full circle.

JOY: Where do you see yourself in 10 years time? What do you think you’ll be doing?

ANDY: I’ll stil be here buddy…still here explaining to my parents why I don’t have a real job.

JOY: What’s your advice for graduates / up and coming actors trying to get in the industry?

ANDY: I would say take control. Start building a portfolio of work, whether that’s creating it for youtube or helping others with their projects.

Get out there and meet people. You never know, you might meet someone that recognises your potential and are willing to make sacrifices to see you get there.

Finally, work on yourself. Take Acting classes, yoga, gym, pilates, meditation, pole dancing….wait. Focus on staying positive and oozing good energy because that will make you amazing to work with!

Anyway hope to see you on set.

Photos courtesy of Andy Trieu.

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Theatre Review: Going Down written by Michele Lee

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Michele Lee is to be congratulated for writing a brilliant play, Going Down which cleverly deals with topical issues in a comical way. The main one being whether writers from migrant backgrounds should be forced into writing migrant stories that don’t belong to them. That is something which Natalie Yang, (played by Catherine Davies) a Hmong-Australian writer, is faced with.

Natalie goes on a book tour all the way to rural Victoria to promote her memoir, Banana Girl which receives a lukewarm reception by her audience of three, who is horrified by the amount of sex involved. They point out how much they admire Lu Lu Jayadi (played by Jenny Wu), whose memoir about her experiences as a refugee has made her a literary icon and why doesn’t she do the same? Natalie rejects the migrant narrative and decides, while on a wild night out with her friends Tilda (Naomi Rukavina) and Matt (Paul Blenheim), to write about her sex life and makes the brash decision to write 100 cocks in 100 nights. 

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Catherine Davies is outstanding, playing super energised Natalie, which is like watching her run a marathon throughout the play, due to her highly physical performance. It’s not until the end when Natalie reunites with her mother that we see a softer, gentler, empathetic side to her character. Jenny Wu is also to be commended for her versatility in playing multiple roles that are distinctive – I loved watching her play Lu Lu Jayadi (Natalie’s arch-nemesis) to a poor homeless woman to Natalie’s mother. Naomi Rukavina gives a powerful performance as Natalie’s friend. A wonderful touching moment is when she mops up Natalie’s face after she’s just barfed up a donut – here the tone of the play changes to a more peaceful one. Josh Price is hilarious and adds additional comedic undertones to the play. Paul Blenheim gives a convincing performance as Tilda’s on again, off again boyfriend.

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I loved the clever set design by The Sister Hayes, with the pull out bed under the stairs of the stage and the projection of tweets and texts. Congratulations to Leticia Caceres for directing such a entertaining play – the performances of the actors and the staging were outstanding.

8 / 10

Photos courtesy of Sydney Theatre Co

Sydney Theatre Company’s Going Down is at Wharf 2 Theatre until May 5 

Writers Actors Talk about diversity and change with Joy Hopwood, Alice Pung and Aileen Huynh

Joy Hopwood’s interview with Michael Wang.

Video link below

  Writers – Actors Talk (documentary) 8 mins

 

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DOCUMENTARY DIRECTED BY MICHAEL WANG.

The purpose was to create something engaging, creative and shareable that would explore themes which were important and timeless. To better inform young Australians growing up of who came before them and what lessons they can learn from those who came before them. Recognising how paths in life can be challenged and different ways pitfalls can be managed to become successful in the performance arts, publication and film/TV industry.

Michael Wang is an online digital marketer who is born and raised in Melbourne. Working at his own consultancy Marketandpress.com he creates engaging video and advertising campaigns helping businesses improve their growth. For all this work is geared towards fulfilling his greater life’s purpose of becoming a feature-length filmmaker. He is a budding filmmaker who creates unique engaging stories and pieces of content and regularly enjoys uploading them to his personal portfolio at Huristic.com

A Very Lovely thanks to the Guest Speakers: Aileen Huynh, Joy Hopwood & Alice Pung.

Produced by the Victorian Multicultural Commission in Association with Swinburne University.
Special thanks to the team: Director Of Photography Jake Evans. Advisors Vincent Giarrusso, Helen Kapalos for you guidance.

Working with Us:
Michael Wang – Michael@MarketandPress.com
https://www.instagram.com/huristic/
https://www.facebook.com/huristic.com.au/

Jake Evans (jake_evans16@hotmail.com)

Joy Hopwood – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCd7E7HS4wYqGKrqisPGnHaA
https://www.instagram.com/joyhouseproductions/

Aileen Huynh – sydney@hansencreative.com.au

Helen Kapalos – https://www.multicultural.vic.gov.au/about-us/commissioners

https://www.instagram.com/multiculturevic/

Vincent Giarrusso – http://www.swinburne.edu.au/health-arts-design/staff/profile/index.php?id=vgiarrusso

Theatre Review: Black is the New White

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Black is the New White returns for 2018, after a successful season last year at Sydney Theatre Company, with all the characters we love. The only main cast change is Miranda Tapsell as the quirky fashion designer, Rose. Tapsell adds a youthful, vibrance to this season. The play is cleverly written by Nakkiah Lui who uses comedy to address serious issues affecting the Indigenous.

A comical love story about a hotshot lawyer, Charlotte Gibson, and her broke cellist, Francis Smith, who fall in love defying their parents. She is the daughter of Australia’s most prominent Aboriginal politician and he is the son of a conservative rival. The two are engaged and invite their families to meet, not knowing that their fathers are having a argument on Twitter. When they unite at a Christmas dinner, all hell breaks loose as the fathers’ long standing feud comes to a head. Secrets come pouring out and hypocrisies regarding race, gender, social class status and religion is exposed in a sharp-witted, humorous way.

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I particularly enjoyed and was entertained by Stokes’ stage entrance, Tapsell’s quirkiness and youthful energy she brought to Rose’s character and Vanessa’s final revelations, all thanks to Paige Rattray’s direction and Lui’s clever writing.

The play’s message is about class expectations, race and most of all – being true to yourself, not living according to society or family expectations.

Starring Shari Sebbens (Charlotte Gibson), Tom Stokes (Francis Smith), Tony Briggs and Melodie Reynolds-Diarra (Ray and Joan) Geoff Morrell and Vanessa Downing (Marie and Dennison Smith), Miranda Tapsell (Rose) and Anthony Taufa (Rose’s husband).

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Black is the new White is at Roslyn Packer Theatre from March 2nd, 2018.

http://www.sydneytheatre.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

Theatre Review: According to Otto

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World premiere of new Australian play – According to Otto
It’s Otto Brooks’ 16th birthday and he’s about to reveal his big secret to his family – he’s gay! 
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Otto has the usual family – parents who love and embarrass him, a Uni student sister, a loving Nana who’s disabled and loves to blurt out hilarious pop culture statements, and a best friend, Max, who he’s secretly in love with. Plus there’s a school bully out to get him, Otto has a lot to go through before he’s out and truly happy. Hence, “time to delve into the world according to Otto!” 
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This play is directed by Wayne Tunks and is well cast, particularly the lead role, Otto, played by Jasper Musgrave. Musgrave gives a strong, truthful performance as sixteen year old Otto coming out. He is supported by a wonderful ensemble cast. Tunks plays his father who is very caring and understanding towards him coming out and gives a powerful performance particularly in the scene when he’s confronting the principal.
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Another favourite scene of mine is where Otto’s mother is at work with a gay colleague, Simon who’s very camp, played by Andrew Wang. Together they have hilarious conversations about life and his cat. I love the staging and choreography of this play as it’s often stylised to give emphasis to the dialogue. Also diversity plays an important role in the storyline, which is a positive, as this reflects our modern society as it stands today.
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According to Otto is playing at Depot Theatre, 142 Addison Rd, Marrickville.
14th – 24th February 2018.
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Wayne Tunks is one the leading lights in the independent theatre world. His plays have been performed worldwide. His most popular plays include, “The Subtle Art of Flirting, The Bridesmaid Must Die, We’ll Always Have Wagga, The Girlie Show, Fag Boy & the Married Guy, Silvertop Ash, Everything I Know I Learnt From Madonna and this year’s hit plays, Bitch and Diva Wars. Wayne is a former storyliner on TV’s Neighbours, and in 2018 releases his web series, After Nightfall.
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Running time: 105 minutes including interval
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Producer: Wayne Tunks
Director: Wayne Tunks
Assistant Director: Daniel Pollock
Lighting Designer: Louise Mason
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Cast: Felicity Burke, Alice Furze, Cooper Mortlock, Jacinta Moses, Jasper Musgrave, Tasha O’Brien, Brendan Paul, Wayne Tunks and Andrew Wang

Film Review – I, Tonya

 

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I, Tonya is based on the true story of controversial 1990’s figure skater Tonya Harding played by Margot Robbie. This is a dark comedy with lots of mature content as Harding was seriously abused by both her mother, LaVona (Allison Janney) and boyfriend/husband, Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan). There are some heavy, dramatic, jaw dropping scenes where the audience screamed and squirmed with anguish as the scenes of abuse were depicted realistically, with intense emotional impact.

The movie presents a pretty bleak view of Tonya’s upbringing and the intense scrutiny she was under by the media and the public when she rose to compete at her highest level- the 1994 Winter Olympics, and the attack on her rival, Nancy Kerrigan (Caitlin Carver).

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The real-life Harding has given I, Tonya, her approval, as the film portrays her as a person shaped by abandonment, abuse and is empathetic to her fighting spirit, as she was often looked down upon, being a girl brought up by a single mother with very little money. All she wanted was to be loved as her life was often plagued with abuse, rejection and disappointment. Harding has said that in the film version she didn’t go up and confront the judges about her skating scores, she did that privately in real life, and that she doesn’t swear as much as the film portrayed her to be, that was obviously for dramatic effect.

The film was made with a $11 million budget, and Margot Robbie is impressive with her skating ability and her dedicated, heart felt, gutsy portrayal of Harding. Robbie even herniated a disc in her neck while skating and was so overwrought filming a violent scene with her on screen husband (Sebastian Stan) that she stormed off the set screaming. The film is enhanced with special effects in a few key places – the triple axels and adding more people in the audience.

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Overall the film is impressive with Australian director Craig Gillespie at the helm as the whole cast is outstanding, performance-wise, and they all resemble the actual real-life people they portray. Snippets of them are showed at the end of the movie and during the closing credits. Margot Robbie and Allison Janney deserve to be nominated for the SAG and the Oscars – fingers crossed they’ll win. I rate this movie 8.5/10.

Photos courtesy of I, Tonya, the movie, LuckyChap Entertainment.

 

 

 

 

Film Review – Three Summers

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Over three years, the same people attend a music festival Westival, staged in rural outback Western Australia and during this time relationships change and evolve.

The main storyline concentrates on the love story between Keevy (Rebecca Breeds), a down to earth pub band fiddler, and theremin player Roland (Robert Sheehan), together they meet at the festival. Roland encourages Keevy to apply to a music conservatorium which causes great drama, especially with Keevy’s father played by John Waters. There are great supporting characters in the film, such as Michael Caton, who plays a racist and Magda Szubanski who is the community radio announcer and Deborah Mailman who plays a therapist who runs the festival’s Alcoholics Anonymous sessions. As a secondary storyline, the film concentrates on some aspects of contemporary Australian society such as the plight of refugees left in unlimited detention and the problems some Aboriginals experience in their communities.

The film was beautifully shot, capturing the beautiful Aussie outback in rural Western Australia. It also ticked all the boxes which is a good step forward in terms of diversity, portraying Multicultural Australia in film. My only question is, “Did the filmmaker concentrate on ticking all the boxes more so than creating a more organic storyline?”

Ben Elton says, “The idea for Three Summers came about during one of my family trips to the Fairbridge Folk Festival in WA. I was sitting in the bar tent doing some people watching, there’s such a rich tapestry of humanity at these sorts of family music events and so much comedy. People from different walks of life suddenly living in a field together with only sheets of canvas and polyester between them. Everybody’s equal in the queue for the portaloos!”

Three Summers’ Aussie soundtrack includes tracks by Little Birdy, Dan Sultan, the John Butler Trio, Xavier Rudd, Gotye, Sarah Blasko , Dr. G. Yunupingu and many more.

The Run time 102 minutes

6.5/10